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Antony and Cleopatra

Please see the bottom of this page for explanatory notes and resources.
ACT IV SCENE I Before Alexandria. Octavius Caesar's camp. 
[ Enter OCTAVIUS CAESAR, AGRIPPA, and MECAENAS, with his Army; OCTAVIUS CAESAR reading a letter ]
OCTAVIUS CAESARHe calls me boy; and chides, as he had power
To beat me out of Egypt; my messenger
He hath whipp'd with rods; dares me to personal combat,
Caesar to Antony: let the old ruffian know
I have many other ways to die; meantime5
Laugh at his challenge.
MECAENASCaesar must think,
When one so great begins to rage, he's hunted
Even to falling. Give him no breath, but now
Make boot of his distraction: never anger10
Made good guard for itself.
OCTAVIUS CAESARLet our best heads
Know, that to-morrow the last of many battles
We mean to fight: within our files there are,
Of those that served Mark Antony but late,15
Enough to fetch him in. See it done:
And feast the army; we have store to do't,
And they have earn'd the waste. Poor Antony!

Antony and Cleopatra, Act 4, Scene 2

Explanatory Notes for Act 4, Scene 1
From Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra. Ed. M. Eaton. Boston: Educational Publishing Company.
(Line numbers have been altered.)

5. I have many other. Said ironically.

10. Make boot. Take advantage.

16. Fetch him. Take him captive.

17. Store. Abundance of means.

18. Waste. Lavishness.

How to cite the explanatory notes:

Shakespeare, William. Antony and Cleopatra. Ed. M. Eaton. Boston: Educational Publishing Company, 1908. Shakespeare Online. 20 Feb. 2010. (date when you accessed the information) < >.


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